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Written by: Craig Counts, Clarckson, New York in 2005.
Photo Source: Kidzworld.com

  Written by: Craig Counts, Clarckson, New York in 2005.
Photo Source: notablebiographies.com

  Written by: Craig Counts, Clarckson, New York in 2005

  Written by: Craig Counts, Clarckson, New York in 2005

  Written by: Craig Counts, Clarckson, New York in 2005

Philo Farnsworth was born on August 19, 1906 on Indian Creek in Beaver County, Utah. When he was only 12, Farnsworth built an electric motor and produced an electric washing machine for his family. Farnsworth attended Bringham Young University in Utah where he studied television picture transmission. In 1927, Farnsworth became the first inventor to produce a television picture, which was made up of 60 horizontal lines. This first image was the dollar sign($). Farnsworth continued to invent over 165 other items such as equipment for converting an optical image into an electrical signal, amplifier, cathode-ray, vacuum tubes, electrical scanners, electron multipliers and photoelectric materials. Philo Farnsworth died on March 11, 1971, in Salt Lake City, Utah.   Alexander Graham Bell was a pioneer in the field of telecommunications. Bell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1847. He is known most famously for inventing the modern telephone, but Bell also invented the phonograph, microphone and photophone. In 1872, Bell founded a school for deaf-mutes in Boston, Massachusetts. The first working telephone was used on March 10, 1876. In 1877, Bell formed the Bell Telephone Company to operate the local telephone exchange operation. In 1896, Bell was elected the first President of the National Geographic Society. Alexander Graham Bell died on August 2nd, 1922, in Beddeck, Nova Scotia, Canada.   Admiral Grace Murray Hopper was known as a pioneer computer scientist. Whilst in the Navy, Hopper learned to program a Mark I computing machine, and put together a 500-page Manual of Operations for the Automatic Sequence-Controlled Calculator, in which she described and explained how early computers worked. Hopper's most significant invention however, was the compiler. The compiler is an intermediate program that translates English language instructions into the language of the target computer. Hopper was an important and dedicated pioneer of computer science.   Wernher von Braun was known as one of the world's first rocket engineers and a leading authority on space travel. His will to expand man's knowledge through the exploration of space led to the development of the Explorer satellites, the Jupiter and Jupiter-C rockets, Pershing, the Redstone rocket, Saturn rockets, and Skylab, the world's first space station. Living in Huntsville, Alabama from 1950 to 1970, Dr. von Braun first directed the technical development of the U.S. Army's ballistic missile program at Redstone Arsenal.   Thomas Alva Edison was born in Milan, Ohio in 1847. He invented such things as the practical electric light bulb, phonograph, electric generating system, Edison storage battery, motion picture projector, and the sound-recording device. In 1883, he came up with the Edison effect, which is the flow of electrons from a heated filament. In 1915, he was appointed president of the U.S. Navy Consulting Board. Sadly, Edison died in West Orange, New Jersey on October 18, 1931.