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State Contact Information

  •  
  • SEE FULL REGIONAL & STATE CONTACT LIST
  • sdsu Dr. Duane Crum
    State Leader

    (858) 414-6534
     
  • PLTW Karen Latuner
    Director of School Engagement  PLTW


    (310) 977-3647
  • eastbay Dr. Oscar Wambuguh
    Director, Biomedical Science Affiliate
    Director, Prehealth Academic Program
    (510) 885-3252

  • sdsu Dr. Eugene Hirschkoff
    Director of Program Quality

    (619) 992-6301
  • sdsu  Michelle Bunn, MA
    Associate Director, Affiliate Institute
    School Programs Manager

    (619) 316-3015
  • sdsu Dr. Bruce Westermo
    Director, Engineering Affiliate Institute
    Associate Dean, College of Engineering


    (619) 594-7007
     
  • SEE FULL REGIONAL & STATE CONTACT LIST

..::Summary of Key Statements From the Annual Program Assessment::..


1. Within any state, the racial and ethnic student population of PLTW schools is collectively proportionate to the overall population.

2. The racial and ethnic population of students in PL TW courses is collectively proportional to the overall school population, except that African American students are underrepresented in PLTW classrooms in schools that have large African American populations.

3. PLTW courses attract a much more diverse population than engineering and technology programs in colleges and universities.

4. Project Lead The Way is close to achieving proportional representation of all races/ethnicities at the national level.

5. Project Lead The Way is doing much better than college engineering programs at achieving proportional representation of all races/ethnicities at the national level.

6. Project Lead The Way serves schools at all levels of affluence, and is proportionately represented in the poorest schools.

7. Females are represented in PLTW classrooms at approximately the same rate as in engineering and technology programs in college.

8. Over 80% of PLTW seniors plan to attend a university, college or community college, compared with 63% for average seniors. About 60% of seniors indicated an intention to study science, engineering or technology compared to a national average of 25%.

9. Over 90% of PL TW seniors said they had a clear and confident sense of the types of college majors and jobs they intended to pursue and their PLTW experiences were very significant in developing this self-knowledge.

10. Over 80% of PLTW seniors said their PLTW experiences significantly increased their ability to succeed in post-secondary education.

11. Over 80% of PL TW seniors say they are preparing themselves for jobs that strongly emphasize engineering, technology and computer science.

12. 95% of PLTW high school alumni, when surveyed in the summer before entering college, indicated an intention to pursue a bachelor's degree. Forty-five percent intend to continue on to a master's degree, and 5% want a doctorate.

13. Over 80% of PLTW alumni, when surveyed the summer before entering college, indicated an intention to study engineering, technology, computer science, or another applied science.

14. The final assessments designed by PLTW and administered in all courses (except EDD) are challenging tests, evidenced by the fact that the average score is 70. This is consistent with PLTW' s mission to prepare students for college level work.

15. The grade distribution on the final assessments is almost perfectly Gaussian with a mean of 70% showing that the tests are both challenging and are well calibrated to assess the full range of student abilities.

16. Girls perform as well as boys on the final assessments.

17. All race/ethnic groups performed equally well on the final assessments except for African Americans, who performed about 10 points lower than the other groups. (there were insufficient numbers of Native Americans to draw conclusions about their relative performance)

18. Performance on the [mal assessment is uniform across PLTW courses except in POE where scores are about 10 points lower.

19. Students in schools of average affluence (20-40% subsidized lunches) did as well on the final assessments as their more affluent peers (schools with less than 20% subsidized lunches). (The national average is 33% subsidized lunches).

20. Students in poorer schools (more than 40% subsidized lunches) scored about 10 points less on the final assessment than their more affluent peers.

21. There is a clear, positive correlation between final assessments and course grades.

22. There is no difference between girls and boys with respect to grades received in PLTW courses.

23. There is no difference between students in less affluent schools and more affluent schools With respect to grades received in PLTW courses.

24. There is no difference between racial/ethnic groups with respect to grades received in PLTW courses except that African American students received one letter grade lower than other groups.

25. The average grade received by PLTW students is a 'B' and is uniform across PLTW courses.

26. The African American students in this study came from significantly less affluent schools than students in other race/ethnic groups. We cannot separate the effects of affluence from the effects of race/ ethnicity due to the limitations of our data.

27. Preliminary analysis of college transcripts of PLTW alumni suggests that they pursue engineering and technology at much higher rates than typical freshmen.

28. Preliminary analysis of college transcripts of PLTW alumni suggests that they are very successful in college.

29. Preliminary analysis of college transcripts of PLTW alumni suggest that their average GPA is above 3.0.

30. Preliminary analysis of college transcripts of PLTW Affiliates suggests their average grades in Calculus, Physics and Chemistry are B's or better.